Dr. Kaiser Keeps a Good Thing Going at the 85th Annual AANS Scientific Meeting

May. 3, 2017

 

DrKaiserAANS2017

Dr. Michael Kaiser has served as a panelist for a particular seminar at the annual scientific meeting of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) for more than a decade.

That’s a long time—and the seminar is still so popular and informative that neurosurgeons flock to it, year after year.

This particular seminar focuses on cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Although you may not have heard of it (and you may be wondering how to pronounce it), cervical spondylotic myelopathy is the most common spinal cord disorder in Americans over 55.

Cervical spondylotic myelopathy occurs when the bony parts of the spine in the neck (cervical) narrow and deteriorate with age (spondylosis). When this happens the delicate bundle of nerve fibers that make up the spinal cord can become compressed. Pressure on the spinal cord can lead to numbness or pain in the arms and legs, clumsiness and muscle weakness (myelopathy).

This degenerative condition of the neck is one of Dr. Kaiser’s specialties. He has been treating and researching this disorder for decades. At the AANS seminar neurosurgeons come from around the world to take advantage of his expertise by discussing real-life patient cases with him, along with other panel experts.

Every year attendees and panelists discuss new developments in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and they show how these developments are being used to help patients live more comfortable, less-painful lives.

This is not the only repeat course Dr. Kaiser taught at AANS this year. He once again teamed up with fellow Columbia neurosurgeon Dr. Richard Anderson to teach a course on surgical approaches to the cervical spine.

Drs. Kaiser and Anderson combined their different types of experience to design a four-hour practical clinic in which neurosurgeons learned about conditions of the skull base and neck and then used spine and skull models to practice their new skills. You can read more about that course here.

Stay tuned for more news about what our neurosurgeons are doing at the AANS meeting this year.

Read more about Dr. Michael Kaiser at his bio page here.
Learn more about Dr. Richard Anderson on his bio page here.

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